Zoom Logo

European Politics Online Workshop (EPOW) - Shared screen with speaker view
Catherine De Vries
19:47
If you have a question, please write it here in the Q&A box. Thanks!
Seth Jolly
19:50
Thanks to everyone for coming to today’s workshop. If you have questions, feel free to use the raise hand feature or write your question in the chat box.Also, a reminder to sign up for our newsletter for future announcements: https://europow.com/signup
Catherine De Vries
37:55
He is back
Kate McNamara
38:58
A question for Anna. How does the trend of new populist governments/leaders enriching themselves folow from their basic commitments? Spelling this out would be helpful. Thanks!
boerzel
41:23
A question to Daniel: What about the role of social trust and trust in Government for democratic resilience?
Bonnie Meguid
42:31
Question for Dan: I want us to think of a counterfactual for the US because I wonder if we would have seen democratic resilience, instead of decline, if we had had a more proactive president/govt that pushed science and an earlier national response to Covid. So no change to state capacity, inequality or polarization, but a different leader.
Sean Hanley
44:37
Could Anna comment on how she sees what she discusses here with her earlier research on democratisation and the state/ state-building?
Jonathan Joseph Chiarella
46:34
For Drs. Ziblatt and Grzymala-Busse: How much can we structurally trace USA’s recent democratic backsliding to post-9/11 laws and reforms, especially with Homeland Security? With regards to the legal justifications for extraordinary rendition, reclassifying POWs and suspected criminals as enemy combatants, etc., how much did Hungarian populists learn from this?
Peter Rutland
49:09
Question for AnnaThe argument that competence matters is plausible. But how do you separate competence from popularity? As you noted Fidesz has had a super-majority for 12 years, while PiS is still barely able to win 51% support. So it is not surprising that Fidesz has achieved more. Polish society is clearly more divided than Hungary, in part because more people have benefited from economic growth. Better economic performance might suggest more competent leadership in Poland than Hungary.
Matthias Matthijs
56:24
Question for Dan Kelemen re emigration from Hungary to rest of EU — isn’t this a main worry within the US context as well, where by 2040, demographers predict, 70% of the US population will live in 15 states, with just 30% (mostly older, white, conservative, etc.) will live in 35 other states?
Shanker Satyanath
01:01:18
Does the EU impose constraints on moving against liberal controlled urban pockets?
Phil Howe
01:03:13
Not a question, just a comment: Thanks for displaying all of the audience members, not just the roundtable participants. It's good to know who else is attending this.
Seth Jolly
01:27:16
Thanks to the guests and thanks to everyone for coming. I will post the video later today at europow.com. We will notify everyone soon about our fall seminar series.
Dan Kelemen
01:27:28
thanks everyone.
Oktay, Sibel
01:27:37
Thanks for the great talks!
Daniel Ziblatt
01:27:40
thank you!
Bonnie Field
01:27:41
thank you!
Selin Bengi Gumrukcu
01:27:52
Thank you all!
Catherine De Vries
01:28:00
Thank you all so much for coming, please join us again for the fall sessions. Stay safe!
Terrence Guay
01:28:09
Thanks to the speakers and organizers!